Category Archives: diet

Interview with Betrayal Series Host Dr. Tom O’Bryan

Here are some of the questions Betrayal series Host Dr. O’Byran answered on the Parkinsons Recovery radio show this week: 
  • Which gut tests do you recommend for folks with Parkinson’s?
  • Could Parkinson’s disease be considered in any way shape or form an Autoimmunine disease?
  • What tests do you need to determine what toxins, nutrient and mineral excess of deficiencies, etc. you have?
  • I am fighting to reverse my PD symptoms, which are a left hand tremor and a left shoulder freeze. My symptoms have lessened in intensity, but do you have a suggestion of what I can do? 
  • Quite a lot of calories come from gluten foods and dairy (I don’t eat processed foods or drinks) so I would like your advice on how best to maintain my calorie intake.
  • What do you think about microwaves?
  • I think It was mentioned in Betrayal episode 3 that the blood test for gluten intolerance was not fine enough to pick up all intolerances. Is there a test which we can ask for which is more accurate?
  • Would you pass along a name of a Functional Medicine Consultant with experience in Parkinsons Disease in my area or at least how to seek one out?
  • Could you be more specific about diet recommendations? Do you have general guidelines regarding diet?
Click on the link below to hear the replay of my interview with Dr. O’Bryan.    
 
Please follow and like us:

Anxiety and Depression Relief through Natural Interventions

Click on the link below to claim Dr. Kristen Allott’s handout for how to achieve depression relief by optimizing your brain health. The handout provides excellent guidelines that make it possible to achieve depression relief and reduce anxiety by eating small amounts of protein throughout the day.

Dr. Allott will be a guest on the Parkinsons Recovery Radio Show Halloween. Call into the show and ask her your questions! I have copied below Dr. Allott’s overview of how the right nutrition can reduce anxiety and offer relef from depression.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery
http://www.parkinsonsrecovery.com

 

Optimize Your Brain

Copyright © 2012 Kristen Allott, ND, L.Ac.

www.dynamicpaths.com

Please consult with your doctor before changing your diet.

Healthy Protein Sources

Legumes Nuts

Firm Tofu 1/2 c 20 g Nuts 1/4 c 8 g

Tofu 1/2 c 10 g Seeds 2 T 3 g

Tempeh 1/2 c 16 g Nut butter 2 T 8 g

Lentils 1/2 c 9 g Seed butter 2 T 5 g

Refried beans 1/2 c 8 g Milk Products

Whole beans 1/2 c 7 g Cottage cheese (LF) 1/2 c 12 g

Gardenburger 1 patty 11 g High Protein Yogurt 1/2 c 8-9 g

Seed Grains Not Milk or cheese

Quinea 1/2 c 11 g Eggs

Barley 1/2 c 10 g Egg, whole 1 7 g

Dark rye flour 1/2 c 9 g

Millet 1/2 c 4 g

Oats 1/2 c 3 g Note: Egg yolks contain nutrients that

are excellent for mental health.

Brown rice 1/2 c 3 g

White rice 1/2 c 3 g

Dairy Substitutes Protein powder 1 T 9-15 g

Soy milk 1 c 6 g Yogurt (LF) 1 c 8-14 g

Soy cheese 1 oz 4-7 g Wild fish 3 oz 21 g

Soy yogurt 1 c 6 g Chicken, Turkey,

Beef, Pork

3 oz 21 g

Other

 

Protein for Mental Health

Small frequent meals with protein help the brain synthesize dopamine and serotonin and stabilize blood glucose to help you feel better. Be sure to also eat vegetables, fruits, and whole grains.

How much protein should I eat?

The quick calculation for your target protein intake is 8 grams of protein for every 20 lbs of body weight, or one-third of your caloric intake is protein. Most people feel  better when they eat at least 20 grams in the morning, 20 grams in the afternoon and 20 grams in the evening. The maximum  amount of protein per day is 120 grams.

Your Weight

(lbs)

Target

(g protein)

Acceptable Range

(g protein)

100 40 36-45

120 48 43-54

140 56 50-63

160 64 57-72

180 72 64-81

200 80 71-90

 

Portion control

Here are some visual clues to help you keep servings to the proper size:

 3 oz of any meat= a deck of playing cards

 ½ c cooked grain = a small fist

 1 oz cheese = a thumb

 1 oz nuts = a golf ball

 1 T nut butter or nuts = a silver dollar or a walnut

 

Benefits of eating enough protein

 Less fatigue, particularly in the afternoons

 Better sleep

 More energy

 Hungry less often

 Better and more stable moods

 Higher metabolism from having more muscle mass

 

Lizard Brain Treat

 1/4 cup of fruit juice or a ‘tot box’ of

juice

 1/4 cup of nuts (almonds, cashews,

hazelnuts)

Use the Lizard Brain Treat when you are:

 anxious, irritated, or agitated.

 anticipating something that makes you anxious, irritated and/

or agitated.

 not hungry after waking in the morning. Try having nuts and

juice on your bed stand and consume the treat prior to getting

out of bed.

 hungry, having gone too long (more than 4 hours) without

eating.

 having 3 AM “committee meetings”: waking at 3 AM and being

sure that sleep won’t come for 2 hours.

 

Optimize Your Brain

Copyright © 2012 Kristen Allott, ND, L.Ac.

www.dynamicpaths.com

Please consult with your doctor before

changing your diet.

 

Three Day of Ridiculous Amounts of Protein: Protein Every Three Hours

7 AM Breakfast: (14 grams of protein) within an hour of waking

Two eggs, 1 piece of toast, one apple or pear

10AM Snack: (6-7 grams of protein)

1/4 cup of nuts: almonds, peanuts, cashews, and hazelnuts

Or 1/4 cup cottage cheese

Or 2 TBS of nut butter-peanut, almond, and/or cashew

12 to 1PM Lunch: (21 grams of protein) meat the size of a deck of cards

This can be a sandwich, wrap, salad, or soup.

Plus 1 cup of veggies or 1 cup of whole real grain-brown rice, quinoa, and bulgur

Be sure that there is a little veggie fat– avocado, nut oil and/or olive oil.

3 pm Snack: (6-7 grams of protein)

1/4 cup of nuts-almonds, peanuts, cashews, and hazelnuts

Or 1/4 cup cottage cheese

Or 2 TBS of nut butter-peanut, almond, and/or cashew

6 PM Dinner: (21 grams of protein) meat the size of a deck of cards

This can be a sandwich, wrap, salad, or soup.

Plus 1 cup of veggies or 1 cup of whole real grain-brown rice, quinoa, and/or bulgur

Be sure that there is a little veggie fat– avocado, nut oil and/or olive oil.

Before Bed: 1-2 slices of turkey or meat

Please follow and like us:

Best Diet for Parkinson’s

Would love to ask what is the best diet for Parkinson’s, and whether high carbs do increase symptoms.

Thank you for your time.

Evelyn

Response:

As I am sure you can appreciate, different people offer different suggestions about the best diet a person can pursue to help their body get back on track. To get a two different but refreshing perspectives on dietary options please listen to two radio shows I have aired recently. The first show was aired April 18, 2012 is with my guest Dr. Terry Wahls, MD. The  second show was aired June 13, 2012 with my guest Dr. Larry Wilson, MD.

Once you hear the suggestions offered in each show I recommend you check in with your body and see what it needs. It may be that the best diet for your body consists of taking the best suggestions from both approaches and create your a diet customized to suit your body’s requirements.

If there is anything I have learned after researching Parkinson’s for six years it is that everyone is different. The diet that will succeed for you is likely to differ from the diet that succeeds for another person who currently experiences the symptoms of  Parkinson’s. When you listen to the two radio shows you will also note that there are  clearly similarities in the recommendations of these two doctors regarding what you should not eat. I would suggest that you take these suggestions very seriously.

It is hard to change eating habits, but as you make the change ask yourself every day –

Do I want to begin feeling better or do I choose to continue feeling lousy?

The answers to this question each time you ask it will motivate you to make the dietary shifts that will launch you solidly on the road to recovery.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Pioneers of Recovery
http://www.pioneersofrecovery.com

Please follow and like us:

Power of Diet

My radio show last week featured Dr. Terry Wahls, MD, who talked about the power of diet in helping people who currently experience the symptoms of Parkinsons reverse their symptoms. She cautioned listeners on the importance of consulting your licensed health care provider when making any dietary changes, since a change in diet can influence the effectiveness of certain medications that you may currently take.

Below Ross writes in his own case of just such an experience where a change in diet resulted in aggravating symptoms because the efficacy of the medications was affected.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
http://www.parkinsonsdisease.me

Recently, a friend from Australia emailed me and told me that his daughter knew someone who had overcome the symptoms of PD by going on a diet called the Paleolithic or caveman diet. Basically this means that one can eat meat, eggs, fruit, vegetables (except potatoes, string beans and peas) and not eat grains (wheat/bread or rice) or dairy products. 

I stayed on the diet for three weeks and lost over four kilos in weight. However, it made my PD symptoms worse. I spoke to my Neurologist who said that high protein diets are not good for PD sufferers. This is because the high protein foods compete with the levadopa medication in the small intestine. This reduces the effects of the levadopa. Also, I had very little energy.”

Ross 
Please follow and like us:

Can Nutrition Reverse Symptoms of Parkinsons?

Terry Wahls, MD, was my guest on the Parkinsons Recovery Radio Show today. She tells her own story of recovery from MS using nutrition (in addition to other natural therapies).

Dr. Wahls provides powerful insights into the lessons she learned about how diet has a profound impact on the prospects for recovery from any chronic condition including Parkinson’s disease.

To hear my radio show interview with Dr. Wahls today, visit the Parkinsons Recovery Radio Show Page at:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/parkinsons-recovery

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
http://www.parkinsonsdisease.me

 

 

Please follow and like us:

Healing Power of Art

I’m doing well, it’s hard to believe it’s almost been five years since my PD diagnosis. I’m blessed to say it is progressing very slowly and I am quite mobile and active. I recently lost 95 lbs. and it has made a huge difference in my life….I feel 100% better.

I’ve given up sugar, white flour, and processed food and now realize what a negative impact they were having on my health. I’m still painting daily and truly believe in the healing power of art!

Cindy

Preview Cindy’s awesome artwork that “makes the heart smile” by visiting her website at www.thedreamypalette.com

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Pioneers of Recovery
http://www.pioneersofrecovery.com

 

 

 

Please follow and like us: