Category Archives: mobility challenges

Slow Movement Remedies

Question:

I am wondering about how to deal with slow movement. I never hear this question addressed. Are there any ways to overcome this? It is my worst symptom. People tell me I move very gingerly.

Thank you for your help.

Karen

Response:

The big picture is the reprogram your neural networks. It appears that your movements are being controlled by neural pathways that are a bit rusty.

There is no reason for panic! The brain has an incredible capacity to reconfigure pathways. You just have to begin moving a bit differently to configure the new pathways which will make walking easier and require less effort on your part.

First, I suggest that you listen to my interview with Professional Dancer Pamela Quinn from New York City. Pamela offers a number of suggestions you should find helpful. You can find her program from last week by visiting the Parkinsons Recovery Radio Network page below:

Second, I suggest that you add a little music (with a nice hefty beat) when you walk. Use an MP3 player or IPOD  or something portable. Find some music you like to listen to which has a marching type of beat. Music with a strong beat does wonders for movements that are slow and cumbersome. Michael Jackson recorded some great songs with incredible beats you can dance to.

Third, there are a number of brain challenge exercises and programs which provide great ways to forge new  neural pathways. You might try out a few. They always have free ones to try out on the websites. I posted information on one such program on this blog September 30th from Posit Science which is backed by sound research.

Fourth, inside of thinking of walking from point A to point B, think to yourself that you will dance from Point A to Point B. You may be surprised by the difference created by the different in thought forms.

Let us know what turns out to help!

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery

Resources
Dehydration Therapy: Aquas
Parkinsons Recovery Membership
Parkinsons Eye Problems
Vibroacoustic Therapy
Parkinsons Recovery Chat Room
Symptom Tracker

Books
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
Pioneers of Recovery
Five Steps to Recovery
Meditations for Parkinsons

Mobility Exercises

Many people believe that the solution to mobility challenges is found in finding the right medications or supplements or herbs to take, not with mobility exercises. After an exciting decade of research into the question of what helps people regain excellent mobility, I have drawn the conclusion that medications or supplements or herbs do not offer a long term solution. Something else – something you would have never guessed – does.

I have concluded that practicing the ability to perform more than one task at a time offers welcome benefits to anyone who currently experiences issues with maintaining good balance and also anyone who fears the prospect of falling when walking. Watch my video below to discover mobility exercises that are fun and simple to do.

For information about the Walk with Ease and Confidence program, visit:

http://www.parkinsonsdisease.me

Robert Rodgers PhD
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease

Improve Balance. Prevent Falls.

  • Are you having difficulty with maintaining good balance?
  • Have you fallen in the past or fear you may fall in the future?

I have exciting news for you.

A new, easily accessible resource that addresses these concerns is – at long last – now available.  The Parkinsons Recovery Walk with Ease and Confidence membership documents the strategies, “steps”and programs  you can pursue that improve balance and prevent falls. The ideas are presented in the forms of text, clips of interviews from
Parkinsons Recovery radio shows, videos taken at the various Parkinsons Recovery Summits and YouTube videos.

Why Did I Create This New Resource?

I have hosted hundreds of radio show guests on Parkinsons Recovery radio shows over the past 10 years. My guests have discussed amazing strategies and fascinating programs to improve balance and prevent falls. These suggestions and ideas have always been (and will continue to be) accessible for free.

I realized recently that most people with mobility issues do not know about these solutions. How could this be so? The suggestions and strategies I have meticulously  documented over the past decade are, practically speaking, inaccessible. There is so much information scattered all over the place it would take months to locate the information you need.

Until now.

I have dedicated my time this year to extract audio clips from radio shows, edit videos from Parkinsons Recovery Summits and select posts from my blog that have offered solutions for improving balance and preventing falls. The content is now organized in one place for easy access – the new Walk with Balance and Confidence membership.

Here are a few of the topics that are covered in my new program:

  • How to Prevent Falling Forward
  • Two Exercises To loosen Rigidity
  • Practical Ways to Improve Arm Swing
  • How to Improve Your Posture
  • Strategy to Unlock Freezing
  • Strategies to Avoid Freezing
  • A Vitamin that Prevents Falls and Improves Overall Balance
  • How to Hard Wire Your Brain to walk effortlessly
  • How to make dopamine naturally
  • How to prevent falls
  • Mobility Issues Caused by Metal Amalgams, Jewelry and Toxic Exposure

Click on “Improve Balance and Prevent Falls” below  to learn more about my new membership program.

Improve Balance and Prevent Falls

Robert Rodgers PhD
Parkinsons Recovery
www.parkinsonsrecovery.com

How to Motivate that Lazy Leg

Question:

Can you recommend any techniques to improve my walking? At present I tend to drag my right leg. If I go for a walk I am OK after about half a mile. I tend to drag my leg on short runs and around the house

John

Response:

First, consider doing Tai Chi on a regular basis. It is a good idea to connect with a teacher who is proficient. There are excellent DVDs on Tai Chi that also extremely helpful if accessed on a regular basis.

Arieh Breslow in particular has produced an outstanding DVD – When Less is More – that is mindful of the mobility challenges that confront individuals who currently experience the symptoms of Parkinson’s.

Second, I have a suggestion offered by professional dancer Pamela Quinn during my radio show interview with her on September 30, 2010. You can hear the show by visiting the Parkinsons Recovery Radio Show Network Page at:  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/parkinsons-recovery

The entire show is worth  hearing from start to end. Pamela offers a number of suggestions to persons with mobility challenges. She suggested that you practice kicking a soccer ball using the leg that drags. It helps to wake up that lazy leg.

You obviously do not want to kick a soccer ball while going to work or doing errands. Instead – you simply pretend that you are kicking the soccer ball as you walk from one place to the next.  It works just as well as if you were actually kicking it.

Third, try bouncing a ball as you walk – just as you did when you were a boy.  Your foot is dragging because your body is navigating through neural pathways that are dysfunctional. When you bounce a ball while you walk – you create new neural networks. This short circuits the old pathways that are presently hindering that lazy leg’s functionality.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery

Resources
Dehydration Therapy: Aquas
Parkinsons Recovery Membership
Parkinsons Eye Problems
Vibroacoustic Therapy
Parkinsons Recovery Chat Room
Symptom Tracker
Parkinson’s Disease News

Books
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
Pioneers of Recovery
Five Steps to Recovery
Meditations for Parkinsons

A Clever Solution to Walking and Parkinson’s Disease

Hans de Rijke from The Hague in Holland called in during one of my shows and told us all about how he overcomes any and all challenges with walking by bouncing a ball. Isn’t that clever?

Hans sent me a video demonstrating how this simple technique works. You are going to have to turn you head to the side to watch. Just count that as part of your day’s exercise program.

Get the Flash Player to see this content.

Do you have a ball hanging around at home? Why not give it a try? Hans explains that no one takes notice of a man bouncing a ball down the street.  It  helps make you feel a lot younger than walking down the street with a cane.

The Parkinsons Recovery Jump Start to Recovery program is all about helping you figure out ways you can get sustain relief from your symptoms. Join us in San Diego October 18th-20th.

Riding Scooters, Bouncing Balls and Using Nordic Walking Sticks

Dear Robert

Last spring I was in the hospital for my half-year visit to my neurologist. In one of the corridors I nearly had a collision with a white-dressed woman who was riding on a scooter. (We call it a step.)

After I stepped aside (she did not even apologize) I had a flash of insight: That’s a good way to move along l halls and long corridors of the train stations and the schools where I work.

I contacted a surf shop nearby and they showed me all kinds of scooters (even with a motor on it) and for my 60th birthday I received a beautiful scooter. I am very happy with it and I use him to do some shopping. I go to the railway station by bus and I take the scooter on my back and I use it on the platforms.

Every Tuesday when my wife and I look after my grandson, we go together on the scooter to the public library. Even when I have an unexpected off-period and it’s difficult for me to walk I can use the scooter.

After bouncing the ball, kicking the football …

and walking with Nordic-walking sticks …

It’s for me a good way to move along.

And tomorrow I am going to my weekly Salsa-lesson in a restaurant near the beach. And I’m going by scooter!!

Hans de Rijke

The Hague

Holland

Problems with Balance, Walking, Talking and Sweating

Question:

I have had Parkinson’s  since 2008. I am now taking amantrel-100 2 tab and pramipex-0.5 2 tab daily.

I still have a balance problem, a walking problem. Turning is also a problem – especially to the left, dryness in mouth, problem of pronunciation of some words while talking. excessive sweating at the left side of forehead is remarkable since 2005.  I also feel pain at neck below head backside of ears.

Kindly help,

Sibnarayan
India

Response:

You have a series of symptoms which is typical of people who are diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. It is likely that the cause is multi-faceted.

First, there is an Ayurvedic doctor in India, Dr. Paneri from Gujarat, who sees people with Parkinson’s exclusively and is getting remarkable results. His website is: http://www.drpaneri.com

Second, check the side effects of the drugs you are taking. It is likely some of the problems you are experiencing may be simply the side effects of the drugs. You may want to talk with your doctor about adjusting your medications.

Third, I suggest that you focus your attention on finding doctors and health care practitioners who can help you detox the toxins in your body, I am guessing that toxins are a primary cause of your symptoms. You may well have an abundance of heavy metals and pesticides that have accumulated in your body.Once they are removed your symptoms may well subside.

There are many ways to detox – just check around and find an approach that appeals to you. I have been using
zeolite personally with great success – but there are many other excellent methods that are effective as well.

You can get a wide variety of suggestions on detoxes from my new book which is described at: http://www.parkinsonsdisease.me

Know always that the body knows how to heal itself. We just have to give it a little extra loving kindness and attention sometimes.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery

Resources
Dehydration Therapy: Aquas
Parkinsons Recovery Membership
Parkinsons Eye Problems
Vibroacoustic Therapy
Jump Start to Wellness
Parkinsons Recovery Chat Room
Symptom Tracker

Books
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
Pioneers of Recovery
Five Steps to Recovery
Meditations for Parkinsons

Parkinsons Disease Progression

Below is a letter I received from Dirk who describes the exciting progress of recovery of his wife. Please take not that “progression” in this case – as with so many other stories I document here on the Parkinsons Recovery blog –  is toward recovery, not deterioration. Veronika is clearly on the road to recovery.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery

.Dear Robert,

You are doing a great job. Compared to a year ago, Veronika is doing somewhat better. She has more energy, the lip curling disappeared, her arms are moving better when walking, so we are optimistic and believe that the turnaround – similar to Nathan Zakheim – is forthcoming but might be a year or two away. [Nathans’ story of recovery is documented in Pioneers of Recovery].

Our diet is 70% raw and we bought recently a water ionizer (Kangen Water) that might also help with her osteoporosis.

She is now for one year on Dr. Paneri’s medicine. A friend of ours from Vancouver, who has also PD and is on Dr. Paneri’s medicine, confirmed that it is working. Last winter – because of a postal error – he was for one month without ajurvedic medicine and felt lousy and as soon he got new supplies his condition bettered. He went last summer over to India and spend a few weeks around Dr. Paneri. He told me that he met quite a few patients who were definitely on the road to recovery.

I am doing everything I can to help her and get her body in a condition to heal itself. But there are still some issues from her abusive childhood experiences that might be the root cause of her PD. Earlier this year we were listening in Puerto Vallarta to your interviews
[http://www.blogtalkradio.com/parkinsons-recovery] and I have to dig those ones out again, that were dealing with psychological damage.

It is too bad that – so far – we were not able to attend one of your seminars [Jump Start to Wellness]. But we will make it one of these days.

Thank you  again.

Cheers,

Dirk

Problem Walking?

Question:

My Parkinson has been hovering for months now.  I have rather rapidly had to have help walking.    So now my devoted wife Liz has to get me started by the old Army method “hut one hut two.”
 
I do have an appointment Feb. 19 with my neurologist.  He has had the medicines I’ve been taking gradually phased out. Then on Feb. 19 he will introduce my system to a new and different drug which has some notable success.

My problem is how do I stand (e.g. survive) till then?  Sinemet is what I have to rely on till then.  (A urologist has me on two drugs to confine urology problems.  So far this seems to be satisfactory)

I will appreciate your suggested road to nirvana.  My wonderful wife is 81 years old and in July I will catch her.

Response:
I have several suggestions for you to consider, though I am not absolutely clear what symptom precisely you want help with. I understand walking is a problem, so let me focus on that symptom.
 
Suggestion Set One:
Do you have a tennis ball or a rubber ball of any type? When you walk, bounce the ball just like you did when you were a boy, Bounce the ball on the ground as you walk. If that doesn’t help – throw it into the air as you walk. 


There is also a plastic ball which you find at fairs which has a rubbery string or chain that is attached to the ball itself. You put the rubbery string around your hand and throw the ball toward the ground as you walk (though the ball does not touch the ground). It is great fun – and it helps mobility greatly. (This brilliant suggestions is inspired by Hans from Holland.) Instead of walking with a cane or walker (where people perceive there is an old person attempting to walk) you are bouncing a ball like a child (so people perceive a youthful energy – and so do you!). 

 

Play music while you walk and your mobility will improve. Listen with an ipod. Your wife is helping you with the music of her marching orders, but she can’t sing every step you walk (unless she has tireless vocal cords). Listening to music while you walk is also a great help, especially music that has a beat to it. 
 
Suggestion Set Two:
Nitendo Wii. Ever heard of it? Young people know about it. You play games like tennis which require you to exercise your balance. Buy a wii game and try it out. You can always purchase it on a 30 day warranty so if it doesn’t work for you, just return it. Play a game (whatever you are called to play) every day, Have fun. Watch your mobility improve. 
 
Suggestion Set Three:
Natural herbs can be a huge benefit for the problem you describe. I will be posting an interview with a herbalist next week (Andrew Bentley) which you should find intriguing. Andrew discusses various natural herbs which are very helpful for the problem you describe. He gets great results helping peopkle with parkinsons using herbs I have never heard about before. Membership costs a token $1 for the first 30 days. Check out the interview to be posted next week. The signup page is:
 
 
Hopefully, three times is a charm and one of these ideas will be a winner for you,
 
All the best,
 
Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery 
© 2009 Parkinsons Recovery