Tao Reports a Remarkable Journey on the Appalachian Trail

Tao (his trail name) hiked the Appalachian trail last year with considerable difficulty. Many of his Parkinson’s symptoms became much worse. I suppose some people would conclude that should be the last extended hike he should take. Not Tao.

I received a call from him today. He is doing another long hike down the Appalachian trail this summer. This year, unlike last, he has had no difficulties. Get this. Tao was able to hike a total of 100 miles in three days. He emailed me an inspiring picture taken of him on a scenic route on the trail.

Yep — that is him! Tao will be a guest on Parkinsons Recovery Radio when he completes his hike with a comprehensive report on the steps he took to reverse his Parkinson’s symptoms.  Once the show airs soon, he will join the 66 other individuals I have interviewed who discuss their recovery.  A summary of these reports is included in the 2017 update to Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease.

Robert Rodgers PhD
Parkinsons Recovery
https://www.parkinsonsrecovery.com

Please follow and like us:

One thought on “Tao Reports a Remarkable Journey on the Appalachian Trail

  1. Parkinson’s disease is a new area of information to me in both my studies and my personal experiences. Through my studies, I have learned that Parkinson’s disease is a gradual loss of neurons in the substantia nigra. Therefore, there is a loss of dopamine-releasing axons to the striatum, leading to increased inhibition from the globus pallidus. The net result is decreased excitation from the thalamus to the cortex. Basically what this means, is that you experience trembling, muscle stiffness, loss of reflex and balance because of this fault in dopamine release.
    I really saw what this disease did when I started my internship at Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana. There I was asked to help with a class called Rock Steady. This class is specifically a boxing class for those with Parkinson’s. Boxing not only challenges coordination of muscle movements on both sides of the body, but it exercises the cognitive at the same time as well. Since I have started, I see improvements in the clients each class. They become stronger and can move their bodies in ways they never thought they could again! I wanted to share this class with everyone because it’s something that I had never heard of before, but there is no better exercise therapy that I can think of that could challenge those with Parkinson’s more. I hope that everyone can bring a class like this to a facility near you!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *