What Parkinson’s Disease Treatments Should My Fiancee Try Next?

Question:

Please bear with me as I write this…my fiancee was
diagnosed with Parkinson’s about 3 years ago. To
make a long story short, he’s made many lifestyle
changes (better dietary choices; no chemicals in his
home; takes soil-based organisms; limits stresses…)
and has been to multiple ND’s as well as MD’s for
interventions.

He’s only tried one conventional medicine, Reserp,
which resulted in severe palpitations. He has refused
all other medications because he believes that this
only addresses the symptoms and not the cause.

This is only a brief synopsis of what’s transpired
over the past few years, but I’m hoping I’ve included
enough info for you.

What can we try to help him recover from this disorder?
Neither of us believe that this “disease” is incurable,
but we are at a loss as to what to try next. Any help
you can send my way would be MOST APPRECIATED.

Response:

You have asked a great question. Parkinsons Recovery
is all about identifying a wide variety of alternatives
for people to consider who are committed to feeling
better.

You fiancee clearly is on the road to recovery and he
will get better. Keep in mind two realities. First, recovery 
is a gradual process which takes time and patience. 
You don’t start eating healthy food one week and see
dramatic improvements the next week. It takes the body
time to rejuvenate cells and to heal. 

Second, you do not report whether he is seeing any relief
from symptoms. Is he getting worse? Is he the same? Is
he getting better? My guess is that you and he probably
do not know the answer. I suggest that he begin to
track his symptoms. 

The link to Symptom Tracker is on the main page at
www.parkinsonsrecovery.com. Complete the questionnaire,
get a baseline, then repeat the assessment every month. 
It is free and only takes a few minutes to complete.  
He can see the progress of his improvement over time. 

From the tone of your letter is sounds like you are
both discouraged.  It is very possible that he is
actually improving – but neither of you see it. 

You use the terms “better dietary choices” which is
an interesting use of terms. You do not say “healthy
dietary choices.” I will be doing a teleseminar with
Randy Mentzer in the nest few weeks. Randy is
a certified nutritional counselor. Take this opportunity
to ask Randy about his dietary habits. 

It is possible that while his eating habits are
generally good he may be eating foods he is
allergic to. Keep in mind also that sugar is a
neuro toxin. If he is eating any sugar at all
it will be a challenge to feel better right now. 

You say he has no chemicals in his home. That
is awesome news. He may however have certain
toxins lodged in the tissues of his body. Most people
do. It is just a question of whether the extent of
exposure is too much for his body to process. 

There are some wonderful approaches to
detoxing that you two might evaluate. I will be
doing teleseminars with professionals who approach
detoxing in different ways. Hopefully, you will discover
an approach that feels right to pursue.

You do not mention hydration. When the body is
adequately hydrated it is able to cleanse itself
of toxins more readily.  John Coleman recommends
a homeopathic remedy for dehydration called the
aquas. You can find more information at
www.aquas.us

Finally, I would venture a guess that a factor
that is aggravating his symptoms is a sustained
and persistent level of stress and trauma. You say
he “limits” stress, but the truth is that any stress
can have a profound impact on our immune system
and on the health of our neurological  system. 

So as a final next step to consider, I would recommend
he investigate methods of releasing stress and trauma
that is lodged in the tissues of his body. As long as a
body is in a sustained state of stress. the symptoms
will not and cannot resolve.

There are many awesome approaches for relieving
stress and trauma that is lodged in the tissues of
the body: craniosacral therapy, Bowen therapy,
neuro-linguistic programming, biofeedback
to mention just a few. 

Which approach is right for him? Only he can figure that
answer out through experimenting using his intuition.
Different therapies work for different people. Only he
will know what is right for him.

Stayed tuned. I am gathering information every
week from professionals who are discussing therapies
that provide ways to address persistent stress and
longstanding trauma.

I hope these suggestions are of some use. Keep in
mind that there are dozens and dozens of therapies that
have helped people with Parkinson’s. Your fiance’s job
now is to figure out the ones that are right for him. 

He has set his intention. He has engaged the journey.
He will get better. Just watch. Be sure to celebrate
his progress as the two of you together track the
improvement in his symptoms over time.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery 

© 2008 Parkinsons Recovery

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *