Category Archives: medications

Food Can Fix Things that Drugs Cant

Click the arrow below to hear my interview with Bill McAnalley PhD who discusses why food can fix things that drugs cant. His discussion focuses on explaining the causes of Parkinson’s and the right foods to treat each cause.

Information about Dr. McAnballey’s company, is accessed by visiting  Aroga

Below are the talking points that Dr. McAnalley prepared for my  interview with him on Parkinsons Recovery Radio where he explains why food can fix things drugs cant  

Parkinson’s disease (PD), characterized with bradykinesia, static tremor, rigidity and disturbances in balance, is the second most common neuro-degenerative disorder.  Alzheimer disease is first.

With the global trends in aging, the incidence of PD has increased year by year and the prevalence rate is up to 1–2% among the elderly over the age of 65 years. So far, there is still no exact cure for PD due to its diversity of etiology and complexity of symptoms.

Currently, Parkinson’s disease is treated with Levodopa and maybe Monamine, Oxidase Inhibitors (MOAs) or Acetylcholine inhibitors. Levodopa makes more Dopamine available for the dopamine receptor, MOAs increase the amount norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin at their prospective receptors and acetylcholine inhibitors make more acetylcholine available to its receptor.

None of which address the physical cause of the disease.

The cause of PD has not been completely elucidated, but it has been generally acknowledged that the improvement of oxidative stress is one of the most important patho-physiological mechanisms.

Dr. Bill’s research has focused on stopping the causes of diseases like Parkinson’s by:

  • The inhibition of oxidative stress:

PD patients are in a state of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is caused by the increase of free radicals in the organism, while the ability to eliminate free radicals is decreased at the same time. A large amount of lipid peroxide, such as Malondialdehyde (MDA), hydroxyl, carbonyl, etc., will cause cell death, which leads to neuronal apoptosis ultimately.

The mitochondria is the “power plant” and “energy conversion station” of cells. It also regulates the process of gene expression and apoptosis. Recent reports have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction is closely related to a variety of neuro-degenerative diseases including PD.

  • The reduction of toxic Excitatory Amino Acids (EAA): 

Glutamate (Glu), Also, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and enkephalin can can produce excitotoxicity effects on nerve cells. Glutamate creates an excitatory effect on nerve cells, and is toxic when Dopa Amine neurons are fully or partially degenerated.

  • The inhibition of neuroinflammation:

Neuroinflammation is a common and important pathological mechanism in nervous system diseases and different neurological diseases are involved in neuroinflammation at some stage. At present, it is believed that neuroinflammation was involved in an important cascade reaction in neuronal degeneration of PD.

When the central nervous system suffers from exogenous antigens stimulus, such as pathogenic microorganisms or foreign bodies, microglia will be rapidly activated. Then, the activated microglia cells can secrete various cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ, etc. The cytokines cause neuroinflammation.

  • The inhibition of neuronal apoptosis:

Parkinson’s is caused by the premature death of dopaminergic neurons by abnormal apoptosis activation. Energy for normal activities of brain cells comes directly from aerobic energy, and there is little energy storage. However once brain damage occurs, it will cause nerve cell apoptosis or death.

The Bcl-2 family of proteins regulate apoptosis. It is divided into two categories: anti-apoptosis gene (such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-1, etc.) and pro-apoptosis gene (such as Bax, Bak, Bad, Bid, etc.). Their ratio regulates apoptosis.

  • The inhibition of abnormal protein aggregation:

Misfolded and aggregated proteins play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease. Protein aggregates differ from disease to disease. This common characteristic shows that protein deposition is toxic to neurons.

Studies confirmed that the activity of the proteasome dropped substantially in substantia nigra of patients with PD, which weakened the ability of the substantia nigra to degrade α-syn and other proteins.

  • Targeting Nrf2 to Suppress Ferroptosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegeneration:

Nrf2 is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein that regulates the expression of antioxidant proteins that protect against oxidative damage triggered by injury and inflammation. Several drugs that stimulate the NFE2L2 pathway are being studied for treatment of diseases that are caused by oxidative stress.

Listing of Core Food Ingredients that Address the Structure and Functional Causes of the Disease

  1. The inhibition of oxidative stress:

Brahmi, Bacopa monnieri

Maca root powder, Lepidium meyenii (Walp.)

Tongkat Ali (Longjack), Eurycoma Longifolia

Turmeric root powder, Curcuma longa

  1. The reduction of toxic Excitatory Amino Acids EAA:

Brahmi, Bacopa monnieri

  1. The inhibition of neuroinflammation:

Turmeric root powder, Curcuma longa

Wild Yam root, Dioscorea villosa

  1. The inhibition of neuronal apoptosis:

Noni Fruit, Morinda citrifolia

  1. The inhibition of abnormal protein aggregation:

Amia powder, Emblica officinalis

Turmeric root powder, Curcuma longa

  1. Targeting Nrf2 to Suppress Ferroptosis and

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegeneration.

Chaga Mushroom, Inonotus Obliquus

Milk Thistle Seed Extract, Silybum marianum.

Tongkat Ali (Longjack), Eurycoma Longifolia

Aroga

Dr. Bill offered suggestions on the products he recommended for persons diagnosed with Parkinson’s.  He recommended three
Aroga products: (1) the Core (2) the Plus Brain and Nerve and (3) the Bone, Joint and Endocrine (which supports hormones). At a minimum. the Core would take top priority.

Information about these products and the opportunity to order is available at:

https://arogalife.com/parkinsons-recovery

Sadly, Aroga products can only be shipped to locations in the United States.

Robert Rodgers PhD
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
https://www.parkinsonsdisease.me

References:

Front Pharmacol. 2017; 8: 634. The Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine Underlying the Prevention and Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease.

Front Neurosci. 2018 Jul 10;12:466. Targeting Nrf2 to Suppress Ferroptosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegeneration.

Please follow and like us:

Restless Leg Syndrome, Excessive Shaking and More

Here is a short list of some of the questions I answered in Part IV of my Q&A program today concerning the causes and treatments for symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

  • How can I go about reducing the dosage of medications I take? They are not working for me.
  • I want to know more about the Aquas.
  • What can I do for Restless Leg Syndrome?
  • What is the best way to control excessive shaking?
  • What about amino acid therapy as a treatment for Parkinson’s symptoms?
  • How can I stop my intercostals from contracting, worsening by 3 am and awakening me at night?
  • What about parasites, worms, and smaller creatures like mold, fungus, staph infections, etc. What role do they play if any?

Additional Parkinsons Recovery Resources 

The second Jump Start to Recovery Course convenes August 1st for 8 consecutive Tuesdays.
2017 Updated Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
Parkinsons Recovery Memberships: https://www.parkinsonsrecovery.com/parkinsons-recovery-membership
Treatments for Tremors
Seven Secrets to Healing

Robert Rodgers PhD
Parkinsons Recovery
https://www.parkinsonsrecovery.com

 

 

Please follow and like us:

When Should I Start Taking Parkinsons Medications?

Naturopath John Coleman. ND, from Australia answers the question asked by a member of my audience: “When Should I Start Taking Parkinson’s Medications?” Many people agonize over this issue. John provides his own perspective in offering his answer to this question.

Author of the book Stop Parkin’ and Start Livin’, John Coleman was one of the first individuals to recover from symptoms of Parkinson’s disease he personally experienced in the mid 1990’s. Given his personal journey down the road to recovery, John offers rich insights into many questions about the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s Disease.

Robert Rodgers PhD
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease

 

Please follow and like us:

Request for Help Weaning off Medications

I was diagnosed 8 years ago with Parkinsons. I have been on levodopa/carbidopa for 5 yrs plus ropinirole for about 1 year….I have come across an hypothesis as to the root of the disease….being connected to gut function and flora.
I have been trying to get off the above drugs but freezing is a common occurrence and because I am only 43 with a lot of family and professional responsibilities. I am having to take drug vacations instead of weaning over time since the weaning seems impossible because my body reacts in an all or none fashion leaving me little options on how to wean….these medication side effects cause me great anxiety…worry…and despair.
I would love an opportunity to speak directly to someone who has successfully weaned off these drugs….pharmacists and doctors in my community are just surmising, as they have no real experience doing so…..
Thank you and to anyone who can help me, as this is the most difficult experience of my life….
With Kindness,
Chris
Please follow and like us:

How to Reduce Medication Dosage

“how do I wean myself off medications with out a doctor?”

The question for how to reduce medication dosage was submitted through My Q&A system available on the main blog at www.parkinsonsrecovery.com.  Your doctor prescribed the medications for you in the first place, so you will have to involve them in the process of weaning yourself off of them. The weaning process can take some time, so you will more than likely need your doctor to continue prescribing the medications even though you have made a conscious choice to reduce the dosage.

Many people find reducing the dose very difficult, especially when the reduction that is attempted is to aggressive. Serious side effects can result under such circumstances. The best practice is to reduce the dose gradually and slowly. Give your body plenty of time to adjust to the change.

I think it is always a wise move to involve a compounding pharmacist in helping reduce the dose. They can make medicines that have slightly less in them and monitor how your are doing with the reduction, They will also correspond with your doctor to advise them of the status of your plan to reduce the dosage.

I think it is a smart move to take control of your own recovery plan. Hopefully, your doctor will be supportive of your decision. The people who succeed in their recovery have a full appreciation of the importance of taking full control over their recovery.

Robert Rodgers PhD
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease

 

Please follow and like us:

Parkinson’s Medications

I have had Parkinson’s Disease for six (6) years and am on monotherapy of Sinemet. I have no tremor and do not experience peak dose dyskinesia, but moderate start of dose dyskinesia and and severe end of dose dyskinesia. Have you any advice on this?

I know about amantadine, but I believe it can only be effective for peak dose dyskinesia? I read that there are basically two subtypes of Parkinson’s – tremor dominant (more benign form) and a non tremor type (more “virulent” form that progress quicker, but normally responds well to sinemet).  I welcome your comments.

Click on the purple arrow below to hear my comments in response to the question above that was asked on the Sunday Connections program sponsored by Parkinsons Recovery.

Robert Rodgers, PhD
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disese
www.parkinsonsdisease.me


parkinson’s-medications

 

Please follow and like us:

Mirapex

My neurologist says I do not have Parkinson’s but my tremors are Parkinsonisms. I take mirapex and all it seems to do is make me drowsy. I still have tremors especially when stressed. Is there really a difference between Parkinson’s and having Parkinsonisms? It doesn’t seem like it to me when people are staring at my shaking hand.

Click on the purple arrow below to hear my response to this question which was offered on the Parkinsons Recovery Sunday Connections program recently:


mirapex

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Consultations About Options
www.parkinsonsrecovery.us

Please follow and like us:

Madopar For Parkinson’s Disease

Below please find my response to one of the questions asked on the Parkinsons Recovery weekly Sunday Connections celebration.

Madopar for Parkinson’s Disease

I take Madopar for Parkinson’s disease : 100mg/25mg and Madapar 50mg/12.5mg. I am sweating profusely during the day, and have to shower twice a day. What is the cause? 

Madopar for Parkinson’s Disease

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.

Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
www.parkinsonsdisease.me

Please follow and like us:

Carbidopa/Levodopa

I want to increase my protein intake but have read (and seem to experience) a decrease in carbidopa/levodopa effectiveness if I eat high protein foods. Do plant based protein sources work better when combined with Parkinson’s medications?

Pat

Response:

I am not aware of any research that addresses this question though it is certainly an interesting one. My simple minded understanding is that protein is protein whether it originates from animals or plants. My intuitive guess is that the cellular structure differs significantly depending on the source.

Under your doctor’s close supervision perhaps you might conduct a little experiment using a sample of one (yourself) to eat only plant based protein for a short period to see if it makes a difference or not.

Does anyone out there taking Carbidopa/levodopa have any personal experience with eating plant based protein? Please let us all know by commenting below. I know Pat would appreciate hearing about your experience.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Pioneers of Recovery
http://www.pioneersofrecovery.com

Please follow and like us:

Medications for Parkinson’s

I take the following medications for Parkinson’s:

1 mg Azilect
20 mg Benicar
20 mg Zocor
8 mg Requip slow release
1/2 tab 25/100 carbidopa levadopa

I have been experiencing excessive sweating, nausea and light headedness.  No one can figure out what’s wrong.  What do you think could be causing this?

Nancy

Response:

I recommend that you first carefully study and examine the side effects of each medication you take. Compounding Pharmacist Randy Mentzer, who has been a guest on my radio show several times, says that when a person is taking 5 or more prescription medications, there is a 100% chance they are experiencing side effects or mineral depletions. Be sure and explore the issue of side effects with your doctor.

Compounding pharmacists and nutritional counselors are excellent resources in addition to your doctor to help you sort out the medicine  interactions. This is a very complicated issue because combining different medications impacts each body differently.

If you are thinking about exploring other options, the Parkinsons Recovery Summit is the best resource available to get  information on treatment options that are helping people reverse symptoms.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Pioneers of Recovery
www.pioneersofrecovery.com

Please follow and like us: