Category Archives: anxiety attacks

How Long Does Recovery from Parkinson’s Disease Take?

  •  What is the bottom line to recovery from Parkinson’s disease?
  • What is the secret to making recovery from Parkinson’s disease happen?

Most people hold near and dear to their heart the beliefs that recovery has to  …

  • Take years to unfold
  • Requires medications and supplements
  • Happens for only a select few
  • Involves expensive therapies
  • Happens only when you find the right therapist, health care practitioner or doctor who has the “secret” answer to recovery
  • Calls for outside interventions of one form or another 

I used to believe all of this was true. Not today. I hold a much different belief that recovery is possible for

  • Anyone
  • Anywhere
  • Anytime

Anytime Can Mean Now

Why do I embrace this seemingly outrageous belief?

Many people who experience symptoms of Parkinson’s have told me about unexpected blocks of time (a few minutes, hours, days) when their symptoms disappeared completely.

Surprisingly. these accounts more often than not involve situations which cannot be explained by taking (or not taking) medications or supplements or turning on or off a DBS battery connection.  

 Is this a familiar circumstance for you? Have you celebrated the quieting of symptoms unexpectedly? If it has ever happened once for you, I believe it can happen all the time.

What usually happens in when symptoms are unexpectedly quieted?

Our own thoughts are our undoing. The “thinking” process is something like:

  • Wow – I feel great. I feel normal.
  • Wait – this is not supposed to happen.
  • I have Parkinson’s Disease. I am supposed to get worse, not better.
  • It feels a bit strange to feel so good.
  • I do not deserve to feel so damn good.
  • When any minor evidence of a symptoms resurfaces – the thought is: Oh right. There it is again. I know I will never be rid of this. I might as well get used to it.
  • Fear sizzles throughout the cells of the body

Almost all success stories involve people who have found ways to acknowledge when …

  • Fear rears its ugly head
  • Anxiety soars
  • Stress sizzles
  • Worries rattle over and over in our mind

And

Once fears, anxieties, stresses and worries are recognized, any and all unwanted feelings are quieted and calmed, allowing the physical body to return to a state of balance and harmony.

The answer lies entirely within your ability to recognize and release stress and anxiety in the moment.  In other words, you can make it happen for yourself now. This put you…

In full control over your recovery

What are the triggers in your life? What sets you off? A wide variety of stimuli can “set us off” into a spiral. The possibilities of triggers are endless. 

  • Smells?
  • People?
  • Strangers who look like certain people?
  • Noises?
  • Colors?
  • Shapes?
  • Words other people use?
  • Memories?
  • Touching of one type or another?
  • Invasive actions by others?
  • People who want to control you?
  • Thoughts about the future?
  • Frets about the past?

You may never intellectually understand why any of the above “sets you off” and inflames fear and/or anxiety. It just does. End of story.

I believe the answer is not to attempt to sort through the reasons why (something like the smell of a certain perfume sets you off or …) but to recognize what you get upset and immediately …

Change the Channel

It is like you are watching a movie that is upsetting you – so what do you do?

  1. You immediately stop watching the bad movie.
  2. Then you change the channel to something that is pleasing to your soul.

When stress is dissolved, symptoms immediately dissolve like an ice cream cone melting in the hot summer sun. Set the intention to make it so with each and every moment of your life from henceforth.

The best deal of becoming aware of your wanted reactions each and every moment and quieting them in the moment they flare is that the therapy is entirely free!

Robert Rodgers PhD
Jump Start to Recovery
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease 

 

 

Panic Attacks and Anxiety

How to Solve the Problem of Panic Attacks and Anxiety

When panic attacks strike and anxiety sizzles, Parkinson’s symptoms get
scrambled.

  • What was a modest gait problem becomes unbearable.
  • What was a minor challenge with speaking clearly and loudly becomes major.

And – it all happens in a flash – as if a thunder bolt strikes you head on. What can be done to avert panic attacks and calm down anxiety?

One option is to take extra medications or supplements which can numb the problem.
Unfortunately, medications do not always work, particularly when a panic attack is unexpected as always seems to be the case.

I believe the smartest solution is to find practical ways to switch the high anxiety
switch to “off” without having to rely on medications and supplements. Put yourself in control, not the medicines. You can always respond instantly when needed when you are in the driver’s seat.

I am impressed with a program titled “Panic Away” which helps turn down the volume of anxiety and panic attacks. I recommend you check out the presentation on their website.

When you enter your email, you receive a link to a free 10 minute audio that is excellent. I found their way of dealing with attacks to be useful, practical and novel.

Check out their approach. They have excellent information on their website. Be sure to get the download and listen to the audio recording. It will exhaust 10 minutes out of your day but the benefit will be worth the trouble. It was for me.

Click on the link below. Enter you name (any name) and your email and they will send you a link to the free audio download in your email.  Download the audio to your computer or phone. Listen when needed!

Panic Away

Robert Rodgers PhD
Parkinsons Recovery
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease

Anxiety and Depression Relief through Natural Interventions

Click on the link below to claim Dr. Kristen Allott’s handout for how to achieve depression relief by optimizing your brain health. The handout provides excellent guidelines that make it possible to achieve depression relief and reduce anxiety by eating small amounts of protein throughout the day.

Dr. Allott will be a guest on the Parkinsons Recovery Radio Show Halloween. Call into the show and ask her your questions! I have copied below Dr. Allott’s overview of how the right nutrition can reduce anxiety and offer relef from depression.

Robert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Parkinsons Recovery
http://www.parkinsonsrecovery.com

 

Optimize Your Brain

Copyright © 2012 Kristen Allott, ND, L.Ac.

www.dynamicpaths.com

Please consult with your doctor before changing your diet.

Healthy Protein Sources

Legumes Nuts

Firm Tofu 1/2 c 20 g Nuts 1/4 c 8 g

Tofu 1/2 c 10 g Seeds 2 T 3 g

Tempeh 1/2 c 16 g Nut butter 2 T 8 g

Lentils 1/2 c 9 g Seed butter 2 T 5 g

Refried beans 1/2 c 8 g Milk Products

Whole beans 1/2 c 7 g Cottage cheese (LF) 1/2 c 12 g

Gardenburger 1 patty 11 g High Protein Yogurt 1/2 c 8-9 g

Seed Grains Not Milk or cheese

Quinea 1/2 c 11 g Eggs

Barley 1/2 c 10 g Egg, whole 1 7 g

Dark rye flour 1/2 c 9 g

Millet 1/2 c 4 g

Oats 1/2 c 3 g Note: Egg yolks contain nutrients that

are excellent for mental health.

Brown rice 1/2 c 3 g

White rice 1/2 c 3 g

Dairy Substitutes Protein powder 1 T 9-15 g

Soy milk 1 c 6 g Yogurt (LF) 1 c 8-14 g

Soy cheese 1 oz 4-7 g Wild fish 3 oz 21 g

Soy yogurt 1 c 6 g Chicken, Turkey,

Beef, Pork

3 oz 21 g

Other

 

Protein for Mental Health

Small frequent meals with protein help the brain synthesize dopamine and serotonin and stabilize blood glucose to help you feel better. Be sure to also eat vegetables, fruits, and whole grains.

How much protein should I eat?

The quick calculation for your target protein intake is 8 grams of protein for every 20 lbs of body weight, or one-third of your caloric intake is protein. Most people feel  better when they eat at least 20 grams in the morning, 20 grams in the afternoon and 20 grams in the evening. The maximum  amount of protein per day is 120 grams.

Your Weight

(lbs)

Target

(g protein)

Acceptable Range

(g protein)

100 40 36-45

120 48 43-54

140 56 50-63

160 64 57-72

180 72 64-81

200 80 71-90

 

Portion control

Here are some visual clues to help you keep servings to the proper size:

 3 oz of any meat= a deck of playing cards

 ½ c cooked grain = a small fist

 1 oz cheese = a thumb

 1 oz nuts = a golf ball

 1 T nut butter or nuts = a silver dollar or a walnut

 

Benefits of eating enough protein

 Less fatigue, particularly in the afternoons

 Better sleep

 More energy

 Hungry less often

 Better and more stable moods

 Higher metabolism from having more muscle mass

 

Lizard Brain Treat

 1/4 cup of fruit juice or a ‘tot box’ of

juice

 1/4 cup of nuts (almonds, cashews,

hazelnuts)

Use the Lizard Brain Treat when you are:

 anxious, irritated, or agitated.

 anticipating something that makes you anxious, irritated and/

or agitated.

 not hungry after waking in the morning. Try having nuts and

juice on your bed stand and consume the treat prior to getting

out of bed.

 hungry, having gone too long (more than 4 hours) without

eating.

 having 3 AM “committee meetings”: waking at 3 AM and being

sure that sleep won’t come for 2 hours.

 

Optimize Your Brain

Copyright © 2012 Kristen Allott, ND, L.Ac.

www.dynamicpaths.com

Please consult with your doctor before

changing your diet.

 

Three Day of Ridiculous Amounts of Protein: Protein Every Three Hours

7 AM Breakfast: (14 grams of protein) within an hour of waking

Two eggs, 1 piece of toast, one apple or pear

10AM Snack: (6-7 grams of protein)

1/4 cup of nuts: almonds, peanuts, cashews, and hazelnuts

Or 1/4 cup cottage cheese

Or 2 TBS of nut butter-peanut, almond, and/or cashew

12 to 1PM Lunch: (21 grams of protein) meat the size of a deck of cards

This can be a sandwich, wrap, salad, or soup.

Plus 1 cup of veggies or 1 cup of whole real grain-brown rice, quinoa, and bulgur

Be sure that there is a little veggie fat– avocado, nut oil and/or olive oil.

3 pm Snack: (6-7 grams of protein)

1/4 cup of nuts-almonds, peanuts, cashews, and hazelnuts

Or 1/4 cup cottage cheese

Or 2 TBS of nut butter-peanut, almond, and/or cashew

6 PM Dinner: (21 grams of protein) meat the size of a deck of cards

This can be a sandwich, wrap, salad, or soup.

Plus 1 cup of veggies or 1 cup of whole real grain-brown rice, quinoa, and/or bulgur

Be sure that there is a little veggie fat– avocado, nut oil and/or olive oil.

Before Bed: 1-2 slices of turkey or meat

Deep Brain Stimulation and Panic Disorders

Do you have any information regarding deep brain stimulators causing uncontrolled panic disorders?  The only solution seems to be turning the stimulator off.  

Joan

Response:

A 2006 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine compared the effects of Deep Brain Stimulation surgery compared to medication for 156 subjects. Half of the subjects received deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery (for a sample of 78) and half  took medications only. Fifty percent (50%) of the DBS subjects experienced adverse events of one type or another. Results showed that DPS was superior to using medication alone.

Four psychotic “events” were experienced by the DPS subjects who were followed six months after surgery. Three cognitive disturbances were reported and four events of depression occurred. The New England Journal study did not specify how many subjects were involved with any of these reported “events” and did not track subjects longer than six months after surgery.

In summary, according to the recent research on DBS, some subjects did experience events that likely fell into the category of panic disorders, though such an outcome was not specifically reported.

What do you do about this unwanted outcome? To begin with your DBS surgeon will certainly have some beneficial recommendations. I suspect adjustments to the simulator can make a huge difference. As you know, I am not a medical doctor so this is not my area of expertise.

One avenue of investigation you might consider pursing is to investigate methods you can use to “ground” yourself. This means taking your energy from your head (where it has been hanging out as a result of your surgery) and distributing this energy down to your legs and feet. I will be posting a video soon that will demonstrate a way to ground that is simple and quick. For now, simply paying more attention to your feet may help enormously.

Randy Eady (located in Delray Beach, Florida) is also known as the foot whisperer. Randy was my radio show guest on May 11, 2010. Visit http://www.blogtalkradio.com/parkinsons-recovery and scroll back to hear his show. Randy  recommends that persons  with symptoms of Parkinsons (including anxiety) walk without shoes as much as possible. He explains this allow your feet to connect with the ground. When we are not energetically connected to the earth, there is a short circuit which  causes serious anxiety attacks to result.

Parkinsons RecoveryRobert Rodgers, Ph.D.
Road to Recovery from Parkinsons Disease
http://www.parkinsonsdisease.me

Parkinsons Recovery is possible.